All posts tagged: Tips

Food Scale = Total Game Changer

Between writing free content, self-publishing paid patterns, and completing design commissions, my business is getting to be more stressful and less fulfilling lately. So I’ve been taking a closer look at the pretty crafter photos on social media, searching for tools and tips to make my crochet life easier. A strong tool that I discovered and added into my pattern designing tool kit is a food scale. This is the one I have: Amazon.com¬†– Weighing the Cozy Flowers blanket free pattern coming soon ūüėćūüĒ• Instead of just listing the ways I use this digital scale, I thought I’d spend a week taking a snapshot every time I used it. You can really see it in action during my¬†Hexagon Month¬†with Scheepjes Yarns*! Monday In making motifs for Autumn Blues, I figured out how many of the orange centers I could get from one ball of Catona*. I weighed one motif – 6g. Each ball of Catona is 50g, so I can get about 7-8 motifs per ball. This is the most common way I have used …

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Hexagon Continuous JAYG – Granny stitch

Hexagon CJAYG PART ONE: Which hexagon pattern can I use for this join? I am using the Tillie Tulip Blog Daisy in this tutorial, but you can choose any pattern you’d like! There are many circle-to-hexagon patterns, as well as plain hexies. You’ll want to keep in mind that with this method, you have to imagine that the “final round” of each hexagon will be the same color. I recommend that you learn the basics of the CJAYG for squares. To clarify, here are some patterns that can be worked with this method. And here are some equally beautiful patterns for which this method cannot be used. The Tillie Tulip Daisy pattern is originally a granny square, and I have used it a couple of times before. What a beautiful square it is! But this time, I have fashioned it into a small hexagon. If you’d like to follow along, go ahead and make up some daisies! I’ll wait ūüôā Hint for making flowers with a center like this one: If you’d like all of …

Geometric Lace: Monochrome

My first monochrome piece! These blues and aquas paired with the white lace look like a lovely seascape. I have since used this color palette three more times and loved it more each time! Making a monochrome piece starts with gathering every shade in your yarn stash plus white, grey, or some other neutral for the edging. Once you have your dark to light range, you can get started. I like to begin with my color extremes – in opposing corners, I put the darkest and lightest shades – ending with white. Then I start layering in my other shades from there. My¬†joining method (expressed in detail in my Geometric Lace pattern!)¬†allows you to¬†jump around the blanket, adding in shades as you see fit to best shade the piece. Dramatic and classic Black to White fade – Absolutely an indulgence creating this one. Whichever color you choose, these monochrome beauties are so opulent and always a hit! I suggest it for a calming home d√©cor piece. It’s a great stash buster, too!

Partial Continuous JAYG: Hexagons

Joining motifs has got to be the main reason why people are led to my websites. I cannot sew to save my life, so I have learned to get creative with the way that I join my motif pieces. On social media venues, the most frequent question I get asked is what is my favorite way to join. Well, I like joins that use the fewest cuts as possible. If I can join continuously, I do it and if I can’t, then I do a traditional JAYG. I learned to JAYG originally from traditional designer,¬†Priscilla Hewitt (my crochet idol!) – many of her lacy square motif blanket patterns use a flat braid JAYG, and then I reinforced my skills through the contemporary granny JAYG by Lucy @ Attic24. Okay, so let’s talk about a partial continuous JAYG that I am using for this hexagon blanket. When can I use this method?? To work this method, you’ll already need to know how to JAYG and Continuous JAYG. The actual join I am using is from my …

Partial Continuous JAYG: Squares

Quick tip for my Gelato pattern or any blanket you are making that has different size granny square motifs. You’ve heard of the Continuous JAYG –¬†a great way to make a sturdy¬†join that saves you from weaving in hundreds of ends –¬†but it would be difficult to join this random placement of multi-size squares with that completely continuous join. So what I did was to¬†locate the areas where several same-size squares are lined up¬†in my reference blanket (a Gelato I made in the past – see below). I made 2 identical Gelato blankets for a custom order, so as you can see in the photo above, I joined adjacent¬†same-size squares continuously. Then, I joined the larger squares in, picking up and joining in the sides of the¬†already connected pieces as I went, so as to incorporate¬†all squares of the blanket. Essentially, this blanket was made with one part Continuous JAYG, and one part regular JAYG. I saved over 100 ends between the two blankets with this method. Comment with questions and I’ll clarify anything I …

Weaving Ends: A Guide!

Hello, y’all! Recently I have had a few requests to know how I weave in my ends for a project that has so many color changes. Since I handle my yarn ends differently depending on their stitch situation, I’ll give all of my darning advice here in one post. A guide to weaving ends! This is just how I do it… Of course there are many ways, and doing a YouTube search will prove very fruitful. So let’s get started! I’m using the Textured Circles square for this demonstration because the stitches are so varied that it has all of my end-weaving technique possibilities. Below is Round 1 completed of my TC pattern. It is basically the first round of any motif, could be a square or a circle; it doesn’t matter. You have 2 yarn ends to think about at any given color round. That center tail is hanging, and the working yarn end tail is about to be cut a little shorter. When I work with one strand worsted, I make my tails …